Peasants’ Revolt: Wat Tyler and Richard II’s Poll Tax

Man on horse and rebels

June 1381 Peasants from across the south-east, led by Wat Tyler from Kent, stormed London in protest at the 15-year-old King Richard II’s shilling-per-head Poll Tax, raised to fund the war against France. On 2 June, two mass marches set off: From Essex, Norfolk and Suffolk From Kent and other …

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Jack Cade, rebel against Henry VI’s taxes and corruption

plaque reads: Near this spot was slain the notorious rebel Jack Cade by Alexander Iden, Sheriff of Kent. A.D. 1450. His body was carried to London and his head fixed upon London Bridge. This is the success of all rebels, and this fortune chanceth ever to traitors.

1450 Jack Cade’s rebels disliked many of King Henry VI’s policies, including a tax to fund the 100 Year War with France and the corrupt collection of the tax. A mix of clergymen and landowners, plus by some peasants, marched on London from Kent. They fought and won a battle …

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Cornish rebellion: Thomas Flamank and Michael Joseph An Gof

June 1497 Royal tax collector Sir Richard Flamank’s son Thomas Flamank, from Bodmin, and St Keverne blacksmith Michael Joseph An Gof led the Cornish tax rebellion. The rebels disliked Henry VII’s taxes raised to fund his war against the Scots. Flamank and An Gof spoke against the taxes, claiming a …

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